(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

c - 



fflPL. 



THE LIBRARIES 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 



|Ei rinJ[^Jfuilf pfg frDTlffiran^pin]|E1 



Columbia 
University 



College of 

Physicians and 
Surgeons 



Class of 1985 




■= • i- s _ -. a - -r— » 






ft?;<'' libit \limi* iit& 




-~ "III i[}M 

'tin 
i 2 ftp 

P : sirffrfr 



L =1 





m _ 






•gtliEft — 5^3 




THE HAVEN 

■■■■ " TUC CIMFd 



THE FINEST 



COFFEE SHOP-SSSSS 





r 








i xARKNESS 
PAVILION 

FOR 

PRIVATE 
PATIENTS 




10 





12 




13 





15 





■ 

I 





I 



■'" 




17 




18 



FACULTY 




19 



President 

of 

Columbia 

University 




Michael I. Sovern, L.L.B., 
L.L.D. 

Vice President for Health Sciences and 
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 




My warmest congratulations to each and every one of you who have completed four 
strenuous years in one of the finest medical schools in the country. You now have an even 
more challenging future ahead of you. The years ahead will seem dominated by the 
explosive pace with which new knowledge and technology become available. Your special 
responsibility will be to recognize the extent to which knowledge and technology carry 
with them social ethical, and financial problems. These problems will demand a solution, 
and throughout your professional lives your first concern may be the humanitarian 
values which you must apply to the solution of these problems. 



Henrik H. Bendixen, M.D. 



20 




Donald F. Tapley, M.D. 

Alumni Professor and 
Senior Deputy Vice President 
for Health Sciences 



Associate 

Dean 

for 

Student 

Affairs 




Dear Class of 1985: 

In the summer of 1981 the Health Sciences Campus appeared to 
have insufficient housing for you, yet all were settled in by September 
1, 1981. Today Maxwell and Harkness Halls are gone, and Bard Hall 
remains as the modernization of the Columbia Presbyterian Medical 
Center proceeds. From initial adversity you have exhibited determina- 
tion, growth of individual and class personalities, strengths, talents and 
leadership which initiated a new era of constructive activity and exten- 
sion into the community with involvement long missing on medical 
school campuses. 

You have officially represented the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons at the American Medical Student Association, the New York 
County Medical Society, the Medical Society of the State of New York, 
the American Medical Association, the Student National Medical Asso- 
ciation, the National Association of Minority Medical Educators, the 
American Medical Women's Association, the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, and the National Institutes of Health. 

You have collected awards for outstanding research at the school, 
city, state and national levels, published classic scientific research, 
been seen in widely distributed publications, made professional movies 
and television documentaries, and become missionaries at home and, 
literally, around the world. 

All this has been done with an articulate intelligence, quality, enthu- 
siasm, positivity, ingenuity and diversity which give your class its 
individuality. From homeless students you have entered into every 
possible facet of extracurricular activity while maintaining academic 
excellence. I congratulate you on this assumption of leadership so vital 
to the future of all of us. I thank you for my being a part of it. I 
congratulate you on having done it so very well. Your broad interests, 
achievements, participation and leadership have been well demon- 
strated and quite obvious as you have become Physicians and Surgeons. 

Linda D. Lewis, M.D. 



Lester M. Geller, Ph.D. 

Associate Dean for 

Student and Curricular Affairs 



21 



Anatomy and Cell Biology 



Dr. Michael D. Gershon 



SSKfe 



Drs. Melvin Moss and Letty Salentijn-Moss 




Dr. Richard T. Ambron 



Mr. Rogers 



Dr. Charles R. Noback 



22 



Dr. Ernest W. April 



Dr. Karl H. Pfenninger 




)r. Eladio A. Nunez 



Dr. Charles A. Elv 



23 



Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics 



Dr. Isidore S. Edelmen 



Dr. Allen M. Gold 




Dr. Alvin I. Krasna 



24 



Microbiology . 



Dr. Harold S. Ginsberg 



Dr. Paul D. Ellner 




Dr. Benvenuto Pernis 



Dr. Elvin A. Kabat 



Dr. Bernard F. Erlanger 



25 



Dr. David H. Figurski 



Dr. Saul J. Silverstein 






Human Genetics 




Dr. Myron Winick 



Dr. William Johnson 



26 



Pathology 



Dr. John J. Fenoglio Jr. 



[7 




f 1 


f -I 1 


1 1 


■ 


l L * 


. ■ 


. ™ 




p fi 


>sfljr /vTyi. 


Dr. Jay H. 


Lefkowitch 



Dr. Phillip E. Duffy 



1 \ j 

A, 1 


1 ' 

Hi ■ 



Dr. S. Raymond Gambino 



Dr. Karl Perzin 



27 



Pharmacology 



Dr. Brian F. Hoffman 



Dr. Norman Kahn 





W*f 





Dr. Douglas N. Ishii 



Dr. Daniel J. Goldberg 




28 



Physiology and Cellular Biophysics 



Dr. Shu Chien 



Dr. David Schachter 



Dr. Mero Nocenti 




fk 


~__ . •„> 




SiJ 


m 






iy 




I j II CPHC 


B " 


(I 









^ 



Neural Science 




1 


ljfcfe Www ■ ^^fc ■■ 

B' 




I* 



Dr. James H. Schwartz and Steven Greenberg 



Dr. Eric R. Kandel 



29 



Anesthesiology 



Dr. Henrik H. Bendixen 




Dr. Ellise S. Delphin 



Dr. Kevin V. Sanborn 



^*r 



- T 







Dermatology 



Dr. Leonard C. Harber 



30 




Dr. Robert Walther 



M& 






^ ^ 




- 






J? 


V 









Internal Medicine 



Dr. Robert M. Glickman 



Dr. John P. Bilezikian 





(.1 



3 



y 




Dr. Robert T. VVhitlock 




Dr. Glenda J. Garvey 



31 



Dr. Harold C. Neu 



Dr. Robert E. Canfield 



Dr. Ronald E. Drusin 




Drs. Donald A. Holub and Abbie I. Knowlton 









Dr. Qais Al-Awqati 



32 



i 



Dr. Andrew G. Frantz 





Dr. Mario Romagnoli 



fa i ! 






Dr. Brian Scully 




Dr. Gerald B. Appel 



Dr. Robert H. Heisenbuttel 



33 



Neurology 



Dr. Lewis P. Rowland 








Dr. James Hammill 




Dr. Richard Mayeux 

'NEurolog; 





Dr. Michael Fetell 



34 



Dr. Lucien J. Cote 




Dr. Darryl C. DeVivo 




Rehabilitation Medicine 



Dr. John A. Downey 



Dr. Erwin G. Gonzalez 



Dr. Stanley J. Myers 



- + 





35 



Neurological Surgery 



Dr. Edgar M. Housepian 



Dr. Bennett M. Stein 




Dr. Kalmon Post 



Dr. W. Jost Michelson 



36 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Dr. Henry C. Frick II 



Dr. Jack Maidman 




Dr. Elynne B. Margulis Dr. Edward T. Bowe 



Dr. Laxmi Baxi 



37 



Orthopedic Surgery 



Dr. Harold M. Dick 



Dr. David L. Andrews 



Dr. John R. Denton 




Dr. S. Ashby 
Grantham 



Dr. Nas Ser Eftekhar Dr. Christopher B. Michelson 




Dr. Hugo A. Keim 



<k 




Otolaryngology 





Dr. Maxwell Abramson 



Dr. Soly Baredes 



Dr. Andrew Blitzer 



39 



Pediatrics 



Dr. Michael Katz 



Dr. Martin Nash 



Dr. Stephen J. Atwood 




Psychiatry 



40 




Dr. Herbert Pardes 



Dr. Lyle E. Rosnick 



Dr. Stuart C. Yudofslv7 



Dr. Alexander H. Glassman 




Dr. Sidney Malitz 



Dr. Eric Marcus 



Dr. Stan Arkow 



41 



Radiology 



Dr. Walter E. Berdon 



Dr. John H. Austin 




Dr. Thane Asch 



Surgery . . . 

Dr. Keith Reemtsma 



Dr. Thomas C. King 



Dr. Robert G. Bertsch 




I 



fc 







Dr. Alfred Markowitz 



Dr. Frank Gump 



Dr. Paul LoGerfo 



43 



Dr. Henry M. Spotnitz 



Dr. James R. Malm 




Dr. Mark A. Hardy 



Dr. George J. Todd 



Dr. Philip D. VViedel 



Dr. Joseph A. Buda 



Dr. Roman Nowygrod 




Dr. John B. Price, Jr. 



Dr. Kenneth A. Forde 



45 



Urology 



Dr. Carl A. Olsson 



Dr. John K. Lattimer 




Dr. Kevin E. Burbige 



Support Staff 




Dean's Office: (1. to r. ) Janis Mitchell, Aida Tulskaya (hidden). Flora Atkins, Debbie Dillon (hidden), Ruth 
Pataky, Ellen Spilker, Ideta Daniel, Thelma Cohen, Margaret O'Neill, Joseph Prenzivalli, Francis Ficklen, 
Roseclair DuBerry, Lillian Gottesman 




Tony's Desk: Tony 
Janis Mitchell. P&S Club 





Alumni Office: (1. to r.) Anke Molting, Cathy 
Couchell, Lisa Mayer, Mary Garris 



47 



Second Year Self-Assessment Exam 

The following was prepared to test your mastery of the 
essential information presented during our second year at P&S. 
Remember, this exam will stress general concepts, not specific 
facts. Sorry, but the proctors are not allowed to answer any 
questions. Good luck. 

1. Which of the following are included in the DSM-III diagnostic 
criteria for schizophrenia? 

A. intense eosinophilia 

B. delusions of Ramon y Cajal 

C . lupu s 

D. Going to CPC's on Tuesday afternoons. 

E. fused foot processes 

2. How can you tell that you have become a successful doctor? 

A. Your colleagues refer their family members to you. 

B. Dr. Canfield refers his family members to you. 

C. Dr. Canfield refers his secretary to you. 

D. Your secretary follows you wherever you go. 

E. Dr. Canfield 's secretary follows you wherever you go. 

3. What disease is found predominantly in homosexual, Puerto Rican, 
Ashkenazi Jewish IV drug abusers from the Cayman Islands? 

k. Are Mel Moss and Norman Kahn really the same person? 

5. Should you eat raw pork? 

6. Should you say "stirrups" or "foot supports?" 

?. In light of what you've learned in second year, is it possible 
to get a net synthesis of glucose from acetyl CoA? 

( 8-10 ) Either of the two statements in each sentence may quite 

possibly be true, or in some cases, also relatively false, 
and if they are and the ESR is elevated, they may be 
related (on their mother's side) as to cause and effect. 
For each pair of statements choose one of the following: 

Answer 1st Statement 2nd Statement Related 

A definitely true bogus Sure, why not? 

B probably true wasn't in the 

syllabus 

C cosmic makes no sense consanguinous 

D poorly worded ridiculous very 

E autoimmune bourgeois if the shoe fits. 



48 



8. There are 184,293 diseases associated with HLA-B2? BECAUSE 
climate is weather and mood is affect. 

9. Birth is usually preceeded by pregnancy BECAUSE Sjogren and 
Chvostek are first cousins. 

10. Given the slight chance that sodium gates actually do exist, the 
slow inward lithium current is much faster than the slow outward 
neon current BECAUSE the only cure for pseudopseudohypoparathy- 
roidism is an anti-antidiuretic . 

11. Which of the following may be found at the Bronx Zoo? 

A. Hippocampus 

B. Lyonization 

C. Rhinorrhea 

D. Salmonella 

E. Giardia Lamblia 

12. A.H.B., a 46 year old white male, presents in the ER with 
nausea, vomiting, severe bifrontal headache, nucchal rigidity, 
a temperature of 104 , enough cells and protein in his CSF to 
choke a horse, and a couple of positive signs. The fo] lowing 
tests were performed: AFL, CIO, PPR, RSVP, IUD, IOU, and 

ET (phone home). All were within normal limits except the RSVP, 
however Dr. Gambino enclosed a personal note warning, "DON'T 
trust the plasma RSVP!!" As the intern on duty you should: 

A. Construct a complete pedigree. 

B. Perform a needle brain biopsy. 

C. Finish your lunch. 

D. He's faking. Send the malingerer home. 

E. Immediately start the patient on thiazide diuretics, 
but only ofter thoroughly and clearly explaining their 
mechanism of action. 

13. Which of the following is suspected of having an autoimmune 
etiology? 

A. Suicide 

B. Compulsive knitting 

C. World War II 

D. Going to dental school 

E. 50^ of all diseases known to medical science (but we don't 
know which 50%) 

14. Who wrote this trash? 

A . Edinger & Westphal 

B. Goodman, Gilman, & Goodman-Gilman 

C . Erb & Duchenne 

D. Ethics & Values 

E. Laurence, Moon, & Biedle 

F. V%rreh &-fr&\£ 

G. All of the above 

Extra Credit : 

How many geneticists does it take to screw in a light bulb? 



49 



6 



■ I fiS I 



Bi 
li 

ai 

PS 



BI bb 
BB Bfl 
!B BB 
BB BB 
BB BB 



■ 



Pi I! II i 

n ii ib , 
[i ii ii i 



B 




i 
8 

s 

£ 

6 

■ ' ii ii ii 

■■■bb. m 

* I I ii ii ii 

II i II IB II 

M I II II II 

Bfl I II II H 

| " | I II II II 



8 




i 
i 

i 
i 
i 

i 

» 

f 

l I II II I! ii 

I lll^lll 



III. 

AW 

! H SI K 51 

man 

I HIP 



ii*!!!Nisl^n»^ 

''fliiillHR 



\ 



iipp>! 

ibbbm 



III 




Ulllili" 
■!l!l',!!! BB III ||gilllR 

UIBII BB HUlllllIll 

] II " ^lli 

it III 

e no n UlUm 

j 

I I 

I I 



50 



GRADUATES 




5! 



The Hippocratic Oath 

"You do solemnly swear, by whatever each of you holds most sacred 

That you will be loyal to the Profession of Medicine and just and 
generous to its members 

That you will lead your lives and practice your art in uprightness and 
honor 

That into whatsoever house you shall enter, it shall be for the good of 
the sick to the utmost of your power, your holding yourselves far aloof 
from wrong, from corruption, from tempting of others to vice 

That you will exercise your art solely for the cure of your patients, 
and will give no drug, perform no operation, for a criminal purpose, 
even if solicited, far less suggest it 

That whatsoever you shall see or hear of the lives of your patients 
which is not fitting to be spoken, you will keep inviolably secret 

These things you do swear. Let each of you bow the head in sign of 
acquiescence 

And now, if you will be true to this, your oath, may prosperity and 
good repute be ever yours; the opposite, if you shall prove yourselves 
forsworn." 



52 



President 
P&S Club 




I'm grateful for my involvement in The P&S Club . . . 

First, it gave me the opportunity to play a part in providing extra-curricular 
diversion for fellow P&S'ers in the setting of a confining curriculum and a confining 
neighborhood. 

Second, it afforded me the opportunity to meet and become personally close to a 
large number of great people both in this graduating class and other classes. 

But I must raise my glass to the end (Buick) of this beautiful relationship! 

GOOD LUCK, EVERYONE! 

— Peter Bolo 



President 
Class of 1985 



I want to thank you for the priviledge of being Class President. I would like to 
leave you with the parting words of the commencement address to the P&S Class of 
1979: 

I congratulate you and please let me thank you for taking on 
the enormous responsibility that you have — and for having the 
strength to have made it to this day. I don't know how you've 
managed to learn it all. 

But there is one more thing you can learn about the body that 
only a non-doctor would tell you — and I hope you'll always 
remember this: The head bone is connected to the heart bone — 
and don't let them come apart. Thank you. 



-AlanAlda, May 1979 



I wish you all health and happiness in the future! 



— Nancy Madsen 




53 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




David Abis 





.m m 

Joseph J. Alexander 



Linda R. Aboody 



54 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 




Jonathan E. Aviv 



CLASS OF 1985 




1 \x 


\ 1 


V 


\ \ ; 



Jeffrey R. Avner 





Evan J. Bachner 



55 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




John S. Baird 





Alice M. Baruch 



David E. Bank 




MA 



5 

A 



56 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Eyal Barzel 




Anne R. Bass 





Odette G. Batik 



57 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Seth J. Baum 





David F. Bindelglass 



Imms 
Larry S. Benardo 





58 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Peter M. Bolo 




Peter J. Branden 



Frederick L. Brancati 





59 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




John P. Brennan 





William C. Brown 



Robin R. Brown 



60 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Louis Brusco, Jr. 




Robert Canning 





Bernadette Chan 



61 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




John T. Chance 




Sophia W. Chang 




Mark A. Charney 




62 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Cynthia A. Coburn 




Andrew G. Compaine 



Eugene A. Coman 




63 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Julia R. Crim 





Joan E. Davol 



Gregory W. Dalack 




&4 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Nicholas A. Deutsch 





David G. Dickson 



Lisa C. Diamond 





Sometimes you just gotta say. "What the heck! 



65 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Frederick M. Dirbas 




Eric D. Duberman 



Robert J. Downey 




66 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




John Edeen 




John M. Emery 



Martin H. Ehrlich 




67 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 




Brian A. Fallon 



CLASS OF 1985 




Timothy J. Flock 



Judith A. Fayter 



An Kcwunroni rnotana an owvupwic su#-ac«*is i-Mx^cla-l 
rtuci-^K acuiiiglt to nim u/ifi a^mpki he. wj[ unJcinsram , 




CAS//: icco 

,,„ - I TTiX -6A.D 
vtJjT'? AOtxirTTAISr 
uAKF I2A0 
U> A WAV. 





68 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Neil J. Freeman 





Gary N. Frishman 



Jeremy M. Frend 










69 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Paul G. Fritz 




Steven D. Glassman 



Arthur J. Geller 



70 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Aasha S. Gopal 





Eric V. Granowitz 



Marc L. Gordon 





CtnmMm 



71 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Manuel E. Grinberg 









r» ~ 




I 


* \ 






Lw \tt 


v. 


l\ 





Russell I. Hardy 



James S. Harding 




72 



'^^^ ■ ^^^' 




NJ m.m~t* 




wy * 


111 




vV 


Mr 


* 


^^7-1- 





COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




\ m 

Mark D. Hershev 








Lisa R. Hirschhorn 



Terri L. Hil 





COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Marian O. Hodges 





Roy W. Hong 



Jeffrey G. Hoffman 



74 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




George M. Hripcsak 











Andrew A. Jennis 



Laurie G. Jacobs 




75 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




James I. Jones 





Juana M. Julien 



Qrtfaf Gavi'ai RounJi ; pvcMoqical Putnwaou &Wwa 








76 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Jessica J. Kandel 




Andrew H. Kaplan 




Albert N. Kim 



77 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




David I. Klumpar 





Douglas W. Laske 



Robin F. Koeleveld 



78 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 





Christopher C. Lin 



Mary Ann E. Lloyd 




Henry S. Lodge, Jr. 




79 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Nancy S. Madsen 





Thomas L. Matthew 



David D. Markowitz 



80 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




John M. McNulty 




Leonardo Mendez 




Tze-Chiang Meng 




81 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 




Lee E. Morrone 





ran I ( 

Juan F. Moscoso 



Richard Nunez 




82 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




David J. Ores 





Elba M. Pacheco 




Wonkvu Pak 



83 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 





m / .: ; / 

Kenneth D. Pearsen 



Roger G. Pollock 





84 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 





Glauco A. Radoslovich 



Beth A. Rosen 



Janet R. Reiser 




85 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Nancy Rosenblum 





Lisa A. Ross 



Benjamin E. Rosenstadt 



86 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Joseph R. Russo 





Karin H. Satra 




Jana Schweitzer 



87 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




William C.R. Seefeld 







88 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Mary K. Sheffield 





Scott A. Shikora 



Robert G. Sheiman 



ollege of Physicians &- Surgeons of Columbia Unh 



New York. N.Y. 10032 



Mr. Scott Shikora 
PSS Box 263 



Dear Mr. Shikor. 



everal times not to wear scrub suits in 



You 



may not realize that wearing scrub suits in public places is 
a reflection of a neurotic, low self esteem, and the need to 
eihance one's importance in the eyes of peers and the public, 
implying, hopefully, one has "arrived" at a position of import- 
ance. This attitude is often necessary for support personnel . It 
should not be necessary for well adapted, mature physicians. 

The general public, however, sees public display of scrub suits 
as aggressive, destructive and offensive as It is an open display 
of the patient's (hence the public's) defenseless blood, soul, 
heart and very being, therefore their helplessness when "under 
the knife." 

It would behoove you to stop wearing scrub suits outside medical 
buildings. The next time I see you dressed in a scrub suit on the 
street or in another public place I will place you on adminis- 
trative leave of absence, which may likely delay your graduation. 

Should you wish to discuss this, please call my office. 





LDL:eb 

c.c: Advisor, Dr. Stanley Resor, Jr. 



89 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Edward Shlasko 





Mark B. Silbey 



Elizabeth Siderides 



90 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Philip Simkowitz 



Paul J. Spector 



Jonathan A. Slater 




91 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Joseph F. Sproviero 





^ ^ 


II 1 




■■■■ 

Alison T. Stopeck 



Michael D. Stein 




92 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Anthony J. Straceski 




Alexander Strachan 





Barbara G. Strand 



93 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Pamela H. Summit 





Vijay M. Thadani 



94 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Marc F. Tissot 




Touraj Touran 




Stephen M. Trehu 




95 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 






- 







Alfonso J. Valdes 



CLASS OF 1985 





Robert A. Villegas 



Benjamin H. Walker 



96 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 




Wayne S. Warren 



CLASS OF 1985 





Robert M. Weiss 



Joel A. Weinthal 







97 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 





Robert F. Willenbucher 



David Westrich 



98 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 




Othon Wiltz 





David C. Wolf 



Jodie C. Wohl 



lf!Pr> 




99 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1985 






Joel M. Yarmush K 1 Alan M. Zuckerman 

Lawrence I. Zeller 



100 




*. . f 1* 



Not Pictured 



Bruce Kaplan 

Suzanne C. Li 

Michael J. Palazzolo 

Anne C. Welrv 



HO, ftLlY, FOR H>t>~E4j?£X/F^ 
M£ WAS OTFEREP A RlSlPENCV ! 





101 




102 






ACTIVITIES 




11,111 
W'Hiii 

III ITlTfi 
Hi I Iff! i 

ij 1 1 mi n 
in i nun i 

rrr n ' 

rinnii 




103 



First Year Christmas Show 




V*> '1 * 




¥>■ 




104 






105 



/ 




107 




108 




109 



Bard Hall Players 



For many of us, the Bard Hall Players are a substantial part of what we will remember when we recall our P&S experience. 
As an audience, we'll remember the shows: Two Gentlemen; Midsummer; Company; Fiddler; Godspell; As You Like It; 
Mattress; Cabaret; Hair; Hot L; West Side . 

As a class we'll remember the people: Nancy R. , Jana, Peter Bolo, Alan, Terri, Peter Branden, Tony, Pam, Linda, Marian, 
Manny, Neil T. , Karen, Eric, Neil F., Dave Abis, Jake, Jim, and Dave Bank. 

As Players, we'll remember: "Okay, we need somebody to bring up the platforms "; "But, who's going to direct?"; "How 
about an evening of one acts? "; "We've only got 
two weeks so now it's up to you"; "We need 
places for the parties, so please check with your 
roommates"; "Have we got a drummer "; 
"QUIET . . . PLEASE . . . thank you"; "Aw, 
damn, it's not going to work"; "Does it require 
trumpets?"; "OK, we need everyone's body over 
here"; "How about 'Three Penny'"; "Careful, we 
don't want you to get hurt"; "Great Show"; "I'm 
not sure we can handle that now . . . but"; "Don't 
worry we'll fix it"; "Oh my god, they liked it!" 

Mostly we'll remember lots of fun, lots of 
work, and incredible warmth. 

— Terri Hill 

— Alan Zuckerman 

Co-chairmen, Bard Hall Players 



A Midsummer 
Night's Dream 






Fiddler 
on the 
Roof 




Godspell 




Meanwhile, backstage 




113 



Once Upon 
A Mattress 




Children's 
Players 




Black and Latin Students' Organizations 







Halloween at Babies Hospital 




Bard Hall Basketball Leaaue 




"Cremasters" wouldn't admit it, but they had competition in the form of the "Landsharks," "169'ers," "Sweet Okole," and 
"Nads," among others. The 1983 B-League championship went to . . . "Cremasters!" 




'The end of the Activity Section already?" 



119 




120 



Candids 





Voifejng HtsytlEsto 






121 



Moe, Larry, and Curly go to medical school. 





y vr -w > 

h -T3 ^r X >r ^ 



A quiet table for five, please. 



122 



How sweet it is! 





Come on Lisa, I'm engaged now. 



Camp Cooperstown. 



Where's the ejector seat? 



Where's Flock? Where are the nurses? 





123 





If this is the Ophthalmology rotation, I can't wait for ENT! 



I came looking for an F.I.T. woman 



The Bertsch Boys. 




124 



Wayne, I told you not to give him so much Kayexalate! 



Where else have I put these? 





«*"•"»." 





The P&S sweatshirt, brought to you by Marty and Ursula. 



1 11 be right back: I have to put this in my locker for six weeks. 



125 



I swear I heard an S 4 last night! 



Come on Touraj, we're supposed to call them footrests, not stirrups. 





I 



** 






'Twas the night before the Histo final and only 435 slides left to | 



"Hematology hold." 



126 




Alfonso, the Dean has a copy of the magazine! 



Zip that zipper back up! 






Maybe I should've gone to NYU 



127 



"This is a contraceptive 
foam?!" 





An officer, a gentleman, a . . . 
Touraj, is she one of our classmates? 




Who put the Salmonella in the chicken? 



128 





Where are we fellas? 



From the Valley of the Jolly 





We're still waiting for your financial aid questionnaire. 
I signed him up for a Bertsch preceptorship today. 




129 




Ben, take off that blazer! 




Joe's imitation of a neurogenic bladder. 





Vijay: May I wash the blackboard? 
Lee: I already did! 



It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood . . . were those gunshots I heard? 



130 




I said tatvk to me, not lack me. 

Wake up Ed, attending rounds are over! 




U.S. OPEN WU 




"In the Days of The Giants 



Fall asleep for a minute and they'll cut anything. 




131 




Ken, this is not the time for a guaiac! 




P&S was fourth on my match list. 



Somehow I don't think this is 10 Stem. 



Boy do I need something to relieve the tension 
... I feel much better now. 



132 





fCX? 




I thought your parents were leaving after dinner. 



Anatomy had a lab? 




Escape from P&S. 




Jeff, please don't boot in our stew! 




133 



CN XII Palsy. 



Respire profundo. 







I'm not going to another Genetics lecture! 



Did I ever tell you about the time I dissected the colon? 



134. 



Well, what would you do if only 20% of your class were female? 





o W 




The Epidemiolog>' homework?! "Juan's doing it!" 



Come back, little Sheba. 



135 



Don't get any ideas Juan. 




OK guys, who hid our knitting needles? 



r.4 

1 n 




I don't think this is 10 Stem either. 



2 



TRAIL TO-* 







Fred, you want us to work on the yearbook?! 



136 



' ^fcM 


H» FT 

i 




1 




^t' ' 




P'\ 







I'll take scotch on the rocks and mv friend will have some Kwell. 





I beat you to this seat again. 



Come on, is this a dental transcript? 




Old chart unavailable. 



Bindle, the Heimlich should be lower! 





i * -& 



137 



Well, what would you do if 80% of your class were male? 





More than a mouthful is a waste 



138 




How many of these do you need to drink to get 
esophageal varices? 



GYN on-call room. 





What number did you get in the lottery? 



139 



Did I tell them that the MB fraction was positive? 




Club P&S 





r ft ' 



,> 



Loooooou 




140 



Meryl, you're not a med student, tire you? 





This may be French vanilla, but it ain't Paris. 





Ramon and Cajal. 



Must you bring your mummy everywhere? 



141 



When I get a break, I like to sit down with coffee and a good Neuro book. 



Around the town wit) 



^v> x x : 



mm 



'V -*~ 







The "I Love Neuro" Campaign 



142 




I like to check out the latest Neuro centerfold. 



iandel and Schwartz 



This text is fabulous! Who are the authors? 




Where is the section on criminal motivation? 
And you thought Andy was just a waiter! 



143 



The call of the wild. 





Athena, Bacchus and Eros convene on Fire Island. 
Sightseeing with Lyle Rosnick. What would Freud say? 




Neil's Angels? 



144 




The Gucci look. 




Three wild and crazy guys! 






Do you want to share microscopes? 



Rob: "Tony, why are you grinning?' 
Tony: "I used the pitcher as a urinal.' 



145 



THE MEN OF P&S 



DECEMBER 



APRIL 




AUGUST 




s* 



JANUARY 




Take me, I'm yours. 






Take me, I'm yours. 
Take me, I'm yours. 



Just take me! 



148 




Cartoons by Paul Fritz 



ONE AM A RE.DICM. STUDENT PRESENTS HIMSELF TO HIMSELF 




This a m lit Cilumbn hi mvt'ul 
6cK») aamaim fm. tins Mp/t> 



t\vt> who M>fioa,5yM«s sac 






wedaf etkt 

H-UH4U. 



tyi 






'^ ^jQg\ is "ll* bvuWim of slumpma , a, 
4^ J^ J SuvJl pa4 bt/ly o»vl u>&i n»cj 
S^E**^- f *"■> ' 1W ttw. 4w *?»et 

AM. Undjl\ .... A7(/lAt«- 

•f/i /w2/. ... fikmq 



iS^Sgi 












' v*sSi*.\v f •■' • fo""is in Ttorrf of Atttndinss . 

(So Wwt 5/w*- 77>w« 
i Wo*y offanili 

epaWllC- NtBdLsrn 









ip« T ^ ys. , «^j tn^i 






^^g£?5^' --JSe-'— Rnn- ,'■ rill ii 



2) Go ink bsuclium 




osm*i 



r-~, 
< 

I 
I 



i^->""' 




149 



DwmfoloGy:Qr^ AH in ftta tlinid 






150 



VVorrwn: (he SoRR«ol hoops tfiQt fMW fcot iumpid /fltOUtJi 










^W," 1 *»a aU$ -fe> (y\«4 vat) 
Swell . \~\\ad&i lot tt*i 

r 





MR. ttNSTERl 

f$k 1 am not- a. MM 
f$Iaj7) a mod teal 

%'j Rdlarionsn/p is 

strict! y a. 

professional one. f^l . 

So het P /our 
■ communis 1d 




-LAT£^ 



.... d/fduncki'oh : H>W \t mim 




151 



Th<i univcflsa has voids. 
The nokmal cmw badomas 
disfwtod in inasz pl&das. 
TKts is {hi. .stay of a mil\ 
hok in the P$5 system: 
{U EtfT/OFRTHALMOLOfy. 
Rotation . 




Ind cUv : KtMOfcOV Aljt/kgT 










.2-wd lOgl,^ Ogjv^cjtl^gjgftjJJ IWC^ stw&jw^ 



1st toe&k t ENU Studtavdc btvstty sVuglyiv\6 



Za^ ^ of Rckfioffi : />? fa?/7-zf o/&ud *~Toutt& 




/&£ 




152 



DEEP INTHL eoWLLS OF THE. 
BLACX BUILDING^ RE.PRESENOT 
OF THE H^DES TRAVEL BUREAU, 
A 0W15I0N OFTHL VLRV B/\D 
CORP, IS HOLDING mDIENCE 
FOR OLD CUSTOMERS 












HrVeuP ,-TVE. 6KT, £M"ER5 TO H&f Hj^J^TE f.Alfl^ 
W/7-W 7W£ AUSWfi? 




llg% 




153 



P&S in Retrospect . . . 

By Peter-Andrew Aldea, P&S '83 

The first medical instruction in this country was in the form of human 
dissection and was done as early as 1750 in New York City by Drs. John Bard 
and Peter Middleton. For the most part, however, the standards of medical 
care were very poor and loose. On October 21st, 1754, George II "by the 
grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the 
Faith, etc," proclaimed in a royal charter: "Know Ye, that We, considering 
the premises, do of our special Grace, Certain Knowledge, and meer 
Motion, by these presents. Will, Grant, Constitute and Ordain, . . . , That 
there be erected and made on the said Lands, a College, and other Build- 
ings and Improvements, for the use and conveniency of the same, which 
shall be Called and Known by the name of Kings College, for the Instruction 
and Education of Youth in the Learned Languages, and Liberal Arts and 
Sciences;", thus establishing King's College in New York City. The first 
active effort of starting medical education at King's College was by Dr. 
James Jay (John Jays older brother). He left his practice and went to 
London, in 1763, to raise funds for this purpose, and succeeded in his 
mission sufficiently to be knighted by King George III. (A scandal arose, 
however, when he was unable to deliver the full sum raised, prompting him 
to delay his return to New York and start a practice in London instead, 
which he kept until the war broke out. ) In 1767, a group of young physicians 
offered their services to the board of governors of the college "to institute a 
medical school within this college, for instructing pupils in the most useful 
and necessary branches of medicine." Their offer was readily accepted by 
the board, as it was convinced that such a school "will not only (by promot- 
ing the true knowledge of medicine) tend to the honour and reputation of 
this college in particular, but be also a public benefit to society". Thus, was 
opened, on November 2nd, 1767, the Medical School of King's College, the 
first medical school in America, directly associated with an institution of 
"general learning." Its organizers and faculty were Drs. Samuel 
Clossy (Anatomy), John Jones (Surgery), Peter Middleton (Theory of Phy- 
sic), Samuel Bard (Practice of Physic), James Smith (Chemistry and Materia 
Medica), and John V.B. Tennet (Midwifery). The first graduation 
was held on May 16th, 1769 in Trinity Church. In a ceremony that lasted 
over five hours the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine (M.B.) were conferred 
on Robert Tucker and Samuel Kissam. Subsequently, the first two M.D. 
degrees in the colonies were awarded to Robert Tucker, in 1770, and to 
Samuel Kissam in 1771. (The latter's graduation thesis was titled "An 
inaugural essay on the anthelmintic quality of the Phafeolus Zuratenfis 
Siliqua hirfuta, or Cow-Itch). 

In 1769, in his speech given at the first graduation ceremony of the 
medical school, Samuel Bard made a strong plea for building a public 
hospital in New York. The need for a hospital which would serve the 
community and "afford the best and only means of properly instructing 
pupils in the practice of medicine," prompted Samuel Bard and the rest of 
the faculty to petition and obtain, in 1771, a Royal Charter from King 
George III, authorizing the construction of The New York Hospital. The 
plans for the hospital were drawn by Dr. Jones, Professor of Surgery, the 
same year, and the cornerstone was laid in 1773. But, the completion of the 
first New York public hospital suffered repeated setbacks. In 1776, it was 
damaged in a great fire and in the battle of New York. After new buildings 
were built in 1782, it sustained damanged in the Doctors' Riot of 1788. 
A mob angered by rumours of physicians' grave robbing (resurrec- 
tionist) activities stormed the hospital, destroyed its anatomical collection 
and rampaged through doctors' offices throughout the city for four days. The 
hospital finally opened in 1791 and became the first teaching hospital in 
New York City. 



The year 1776 polarized the entire population, making the traditional 
refuge of the medical profession virtually impossible. At the medical 
school, the faculty became divided into Loyalists (Bard, Clossy, and 
Middleton) and Patriots (Jones and Smith). As it was becoming clear the war 
would soon shift from Boston to New York, an army of 20,000, hastily 
mobilized, untried revolutionaries came to defend the city. In April 1776, 
medical, studies were suspended at King's College, the students were 
dispersed, and the college was taken over by the Committee for Safety and 
then by Washington's troops. Despite accurately anticipating English in- 
tentions, General Washington was unable to hold the city. His losses in the 
brief battles of New York and Long Island to General Howe resulted in 
English domination of New York until 1783. 

The war, the occupation, and the serious fires of 1776 and 1778 had a 
devasting effect on the city, whose population shrank to half its pre-war 
size. In 1783, the city changed hands, the rebuilding began, and the 
medical void left by the war was quickly filling with physicians and surgeons 
released from military service. The war, however, did not bring about any 
remarkable changes in medical education. Medical education remained 
based predominantly on the apprentice system, in which a few students 
attended formal courses in addition to their studies in doctors' offices, and 
even fewer pursued advanced medical education abroad. A newcomer to 
this post-war New York medical scene was Dr. Nicholas Romayne, who was 
educated in Edinburgh, Paris and Leyden. In 1784, with the help of Samuel 
Bard, the former Kings College reopened as Columbia College. Dr. 
Romayne was named both Trustee and Professor of the Practice of Medicine 
in the medical school; joining him on the faculty were Samuel Bard (Chem- 
istry), Charles McKnight (Anatomy and Surgery), Benjamin Kissam (Insti- 
tutes of Medicine), and Ebenezer Crosby (Midwifery). Unfortunately, the 
medical school was short-lived. In addition to personal differences between 
Romayne and Bard, there was considerable friction concerning the practice 
of private instruction by members of the faculty. In 1787, Romayne res- 
igned from the faculty to form his own medical school. Subsequent faculty 
resignations shortly thereafter effectively closed down the school. 

In 1791, Romayne petitioned the Regents of the University of the State of 
New York to recognize his school. However, such action by the Regents was 
fought by the trustees of Columbia College, who claimed that only they had 
the legal right to form a medical school. Subsequently, when the Columbia 
College Medical School proved a failure, the Regents allowed the Medical 
Society of the County of New York, in March 1807, to incorporate as a 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. The president of the society, Dr. 
Romayne, became the president of the College; joining him on the faculty 
were Drs. Samuel Mitchell (Chemistry), David Hosack (Surgery, Midwif- 
ery, Materia Medica and Botany), Edward Miller (Practice of Medicine), 
Archibald Bruce (Mineralogy), John Augustine Smith (Anatomy), and Ben- 
jamin DeWitt (Institues of Medicine). The College was first located at No. 
18 Park Place (formerly, Robinson Street). "At that time, most of the city 
was below Chambers Street. The wealthier residences were at the lower 
end of Broadway, about the Battery and Bowling Green, with the shops in 
the upper part of the same street. Broadway was paved only to the neighbor- 
hood of Canal Street beyond which it continued as a road. Canal Street itself 
existed only on paper, and was represented by a swamp and a sluggish 
stream, crossed by a bridge at the intersection of Broadway." Two years 
later, in 1809, the College moved to No. 553 Pearl Street. In 1810, it was 
reported that "certain misunderstandings having taken place between the 
then president (Dr. Romayne) and the professors" prompting the Regents to 
investigate these differences. In 1811, at the age of sixty-nine, Samuel Bard 



154 



was allied from retirement to the presidency of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. After returning to New York in 1784 and reorganizing 
Columbia College, Bard (the former Loyalist) had opened a very fashion- 
able and busy practice, which included George Washington (whose carbun- 
cle he successfully incised, in 1789, assisted by his father. Dr. John Bard). 
Samuel Bard retired, in 1789, to his estate in Hyde Park, New York "to 
devote his leisure to the care of his estate and to scientific and literary 
pursuits." The year 1811, also saw the graduation of the first class (eight 
students) of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

For the next few years, while the Columbia College Medical School had 
little more than maintained an existence, (conferring its last degree on 
Robert Morrel, in 1810), the College of Physicians and Surgeons had 
become quite successful. In 1813, it moved again, this time to a three-story 
building at No. 3 Barclay Street, and in its eighth session (1814-1815). the 
class numbered 121 students. In 1814, to allow the professors of the 
Columbia College Medical School to join the faculty of the College of 
Physicans and Surgeons, all the medical lectures at Columbia were sus- 
pended and "complete union had taken place." In reality, however, there 
was no true union between the two institutions. In 1860. under the leader- 
ship of Edward Delafield, the College of Physicans and Surgeons became 
independent of the Regents of the State University and became the Medical 
Department of Columbia College. In this union, however, both institutions 
were united only in conferring the M.D. degrees, but remained indepen- 
dent of one another. A true union between the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons and Columbia College, was established only in March 1891, when 
the latter surrendered its charter, donated all its property (valued at 1,625 
million dollars) to, and became an integral part of, Columbia University. 

In 1837, the College moved to No. 67 Crosby Street into facilities 
"unsurpassed by any similar establishment in the Union". This move began 
a long period of quiet and productive growth. In 1841, Dr. Willard Parker, 
Professor of Surgery, established the College Clinic, where students would 
observe diagnosis and treatment in an ambulatory care setting. From a 
single clinic of minor surgery held once a week, the clinic grew by 1876 to 
include ten different clinics (including, Pediatrics, Gynecology, Dermatol- 
ogy, Venereal Diseases, Medicine, Neurology, and others). Indeed, the 
prominence of the College Clinics became so great, that in 1869, it promp- 
ted the establishment of a new grade of teachers, lasting to the present, 
named Clinical Professors, each of whom was in charge of his special clinic. 
In the year 1851, Bellevue Hospital joined The New York Hospital as a 
teaching institution. Thus, medical instruction at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, then more than ever before, covered the entire spectrum of 
disease from ambulatory - care to the more serious and advanced conditions 
seen in the hospitals. Finally, a significant advancement in medical educa- 
tion came in 1854 with the passage by the state legislature of the "Anatomical 
Bill", which secured for medical schools all the unclaimed bodies from the 
state penal and charitable institutions. Prior to 1854, medical schools were 
only able to lawfully obtain for dissection the unclaimed bodies of convicts 
who died in the penitentiaries of Sing Sing and Auburn. Consequently, 
there was considerable dealing in bodies dug up from the old Potter's field 
cemetary, and such anatomical specimens could only be secured by uncer- 
tain, illegal and often dangerous nocturnal expeditions. Understandably, in 
1819, when the College moved to Barclay Street, "for the safety and 
convenience" of the College, an additional building, "to answer the pur- 
pose of a stable" and an entrance, were built in the rear. There is no doubt 
that this rear entrance and stable were built for the "safety and conveni- 
ence" of the Anatomy department. 

In 1856, the College moved into a four story brick building on 23rd street 
and 4th Avenue, where is remained for thirty-one years. This period 
encompassed three important milestones in the history of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons. Two of these were discussed earlier, namely the 



1860 agreement under which the College became indepenedent of the 
Regents, and became the Medical Department of Columbia College, and 
the rapid rise in the importance and prominence of the College Clinics 
begun, in 1841, by Dr. Parker, with the establishment of the new teaching 
grade of Clinical Professors. Lastly, under the active leadership of President 
Edward Delafield, the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons was established in 1859 "for promoting good feeling and harmony 
among the graduates of the College" and "to exercise, in a variety of ways, a 
beneficial influence." 

In 1884, William H. Vanderbilt decided, with the influence of his friend 
and physician, James W. McLane, Professor of Obstetrics, "to give substan- 
tial aid to the effort to create in New York one of the first medical schools in 
the world". He chose to support the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
because it was "the oldest medical school in the state, and of equal rank with 
any in the world. " In October 1884, he gave the College the deed to the land 
enclosed between 9th and 10th Avenues, and 59th and 60th Streets, with a 
check for three-hundred thousand dollars for building expenses: In all, a gift 
of half of a million dollars. However, W. Vanderbilt never lived to see his 
project completed; he died in December 1885 of a massive stroke. The 
College building cornerstone was laid in April 1886, and the building was 
inaugurated in September 1887. The building consisted of "three 
connected structures: namely, a main building, . . . containing 
offices, museums, study and recitation rooms, professors rooms, and 
the department of practical Anatony. a middle building occupying the 
central part of the grounds, in which are the main stairway hall, the lecture 
hall, the amphitheatre, and the rear stairway, and a north building or 
laboratory wing . . . containing the janitor's quarters, the chemical labor- 
atories, and the laboratories of the Alumni Association" . . . "Outside . . . 
are the boiler house, and a one-story laboratory annex and nearby a carriage 
house, with rooms on the second floor for the accomodation of employees." 
Moreover, two marble tablets were placed in the main entrance of the 
building. The tablet placed on the west side of the vestibule listed the 
different locations of the college since its foundation, and the tablet placed 
on the east side of the vestibule bore the inscription "This College was 
chartered by the Regents of the University of New York, March 12th, 1807, 
and was Co-instituted the Medical Department of Columbia College, June 
6th, I860." Presently, these marble tablets are located in the latest location 
of the College. 

After Vanderbilt's death, his family decided to commemorate him and 
supplement his original gift. Guided by Dr. McLane, they founded two new 
institutions for the College. In Janurary, 1886, less than a month after 
Vanderbilt's death, his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W.D. 
Sloane, donated the funds needed for the building and endowment of the 
Sloane Maternity Hospital. In April 1886, Vanderbilt's four sons 
donated the funds for the building, endowment, and subsequent expansion 
of the Vanderbilt Clinic, built to house the very busy College Clinics (Fig. 
9). Excavations for these buildings began in 1886, and both were inaugu- 
rated in December 1887. 

In 1928, the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center opened its doors as 
the world s first medical center, combining in a single complex complete 
facilities for patient care, medical education and research. As a fertile 
ground for investigation and clinical advancement, Columbia has since then 
occupied a position of leadership in world medicine. Presently, the medical 
center has a teaching staff of more than 2,000, a bed capacity of 1.500, and is 
served by a staff of approximately 950 attending physicians, a house staff 
body of 400 physicians, and close to 6,000 hospital employees. In retro- 
spect, the College of Physicians and Surgeons has certainly come a long way 
sine 1767, when "a six man faculty began instructing a class of three" 
students "in the most useful and necessary branches of medicine." 



155 



OUR BLESSING AND 

CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS OF 1985 

from the 

PACHECO FAMILY 



CONGRATULATIONS TO JEFF 

AND HIS CLASSMATES 

from the 

AVNER FAMILY 



Congratulations to 
Lisa Anne Ross and to the 

Class of 1985 
Dr. and Mrs. Curlee Ross 

Carolyn and David 



With Much Love 

and Great Pride 

we congratulate 

SCOTT SHIKORA 

on his graduation. 

The Shikora Family 



Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 

to 

Frederick M. Dirbas, M.D. 

and the rest of the 

Class of 1985 

Dr. & Mrs. Fuad Dirbas 
Joseph Dirbas 



156 



For every parent comes that moment 
of extreme pride in our children 
that makes life worthwhile . We 
thank you Louis, our dear son, for 
providing us with such a time that 
will he forever unforgettable . 
Our unhounding love and pride 
. . . for what you have done 
. . . for what you will do! 
Angela and Louis Brusco Sr. 



157 






U 



MO/CO/O l^_ 

VolaM of 4985! 



{obfaMfrked SPiwcv J 8 98 



Congratulations, Peter, 

for a past well done and 

best wishes for the 

future yet to come 

"Break a Leg" 

Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert T. Bolo Jr. 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 1985 and our 

Special Best Wishes For 
Nancy, your Class President 



SUSANNE AND 
ROBERT MADSEN 



DR. AND MRS. 
ALFRED MARKOWITZ 



158 



CONGRATULATIONS 

and 
BEST WISHES 

to the 
CLASS OF 1985 

RUTH AND BARNET GELLER 

and family 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to the Class of 1985 

Continue Your Efforts for the Future 

Pearl and Jesse Weiss 



Susanna Grinberg, M.D. 
Moises Grinberg, M.D. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

CLASS OF 1985 

from 

THE FAMILY OF 

LISA C. DIAMOND 



IN HONOR OF 
ROBERT F. WILLENBUCHER 

. . . and the greatest of 
these is LOVE 

His Aunts: MAME, NORA and KATHLEEN 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO ALBERT and 

the class of 1985 

Howard Eui Chan Kim, M.D. 
Yvonne Un 



159 



From the Family of 
Robert F. Willenbucher 

Congratulations and Warm Wishes 

For Success and Happiness 

to the 

Class of 1985 



Norman Bank, M.D. 



John B. McNulty, 
M.D. 



Dr. Uriel S. Barzel, 

P&S '58 
Dr. Aviva S. Barzel 



Congratulations 






Joel Adam Weinthal, 


M.D. 






Mom 


and Dad 



Congratulations to 
BRIAN FALLON 

from Mom and Dad 

Debbie, Lenny, Delia, 

Michael and Adam 



160 



Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack M. Granowitz 



The Haven Coffee Shop 
Pizza and Deli Restaurant 

228 Fort Washington Ave. & 169th Street 

New York, N.Y. 10032 

Tel. 927-6685 

And 

Rente's Restaurant 

4021 Broadway and 169th Street 

New York, N.Y. 10032 

Tel. 923-5452 

The Management and the Personnel of these fine 

Restaurants Extend Our Congratulations and Best 

Wishes to All our Dear Friends of P & S Class of 1985 

of Columbia University for a Successful Career and 

Brilliant Future! 



Congratulations to 

our son, Seth, and the 

entire Class of 1985 

Mr. and Mrs. 
Morton J. Baum 



A NWROUXV IAMKI1 



M'. 



ffr-^§> 



||W^|! 



m^^LM^^m 



Roy Pollack, M.D. 
Celia N. Ores, M.D. 

Pauline Ores 
Michelle Ores 



161 



DONORS 

The Flock flock 

Donald Warren 

Rev. and Mrs. J.M. Jones 

George and Anna Hripcsak 

Ethel B. Hill 

Rector T. Davol, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Harvey Taterka 

Margrit and Diane Geurts 

Kurt Hirschhorn, M.D. 

John and Dorothy Baird 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Lien 

Anton and Katerina Radoslovich 

Hawke and E.G. Fritz 

David and Ellen Rosenblum 



162 



CONGRATULATIONS 

from the 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR HEALTH SCIENCES 

DEAN, AND FACULTY 

of the 

COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



163 



CONGRATULATIONS 

AND 

BEST WISHES 

FOR A SUCCESSFUL CAREER 

DEPARTMENT OF 
RADIOLOGY 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO A 

BRAINY 

CLASS 

DEPARTMENT OF 

NEUROSURGERY 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS OF 1985 

from the 

DEPARTMENT OF 

PSYCHIATRY 



164 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

COLLEGE 

OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS 

AND A 

WARM WELCOME 

TO OUR NEWEST MEMBERS — 

THE CLASS OF 1985 



165 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

from the 
Department of Neurology 



The Staff of the 
HEALTH SCIENCES HOUSING 

OFFICE 

Extends Their Congratulations 

To 
THE CLASS OF '85 



166 



Congratulations 


to 


Tze-Chiang Meng, 


The 


new doctor in our 


family, 


and Best VV 


shes to 


his classmates. 






— The Meng 


Family 



To Robin Brown: 

Proud of you 

Love you 

— Mom and Dad 



Columbia Center Deli 

and 

Columbia Center Coffee 

Shop: 

Congratulations 
Class of 1985 

83 Haven Avenue 
927-3300 



John A. Downey. 
M.D. 




TEL. 928-7867 

"EVE""ANG" 



COMO PIZZA 



PIZZA PIE. HOT& COLD HEROS 

— SODA — 

TAKE OUT ORDERS — CALL US & WE'LL HAVE ORDERS READY 



YOU RING 
WE BRING 



4035 BROADWAY 

(NR COR. 170TH ST.] 

NEW YORK CITY 



Very Best Wishes to the 
' Class of 1985! 

Dr. and Mrs. 
Morris Freeman, '51 



167 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 

CLASS OF 1985 

DR. RORERT M. GLICKMAN 

AND MEMRERS OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF 

MEDICINE 



Best Wishes from 
HELLMAN CONSTRUCTION CO. 

79 Watermill Lane 
Great Neck, N.Y. 10021 



INC. 



ORDER A GIFT FOR YOUR OFFICE 
MAIMONIDES PHYSICIANS HIPPOCRATIC 

OATH 

In Illuminated Gold and Silver, in Hebrew and 

English 

Calligraphy. Personalized, 14" x 18" custom framed. 

$50 or 355; unframed S40 (mat only). 

CONTACT GREENBERG GALLERY 

18-A BRIGHTON PATH 

BROOKLYN, N.Y.. 11235 

(718) 891-8846 



168 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1985 
SIDNEY A. SASS ASSOCIATES, INC. 

Group Insurance Administrators for 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

Columbia University 



200 Madison Ave. 
New York, N.Y., 10016 
212-696-4780 



Low Cost 

— Life Insurance 

— Disability Income 

— Other Programs 



THE DEPARTMENT 

OF 

OBSTETRICS & 

GYNECOLOGY 

EXTEND THEIR 

WARMEST 

CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1985 



CONTINUE YOUR MEDICAL 
EDUCATION WITH . . . 




The New England Journal of Medicine 



For over 170 years, the Journal has reported advances in 

medical science and treatment to physicians and medical 

students throughout the world Special rales are available to 

both residents and students 

1440 Main Street • Waltham. MA 02254 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS OF 1985 

from 

MORRISTOWN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

a major teaching affiliate of 
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons 



CONGRATULATIONS, COLLEAGUES! 

The Medical Society of the State of New 

York 

420 Lakeville Road 

Lake Success, N.Y., 11042 

(516) 488-6100 



170 



The Department of Anesthesiology 

wishes 

The Class of 1985 

A Happy, Painless Future 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
MSP 

MERCK 
SHARRs. 
DOHME 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Heptavax-B 

(Hepatitis B Vaccine I MSD) 



171 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1985 



OUR BEST WISHES FOR 
YOUR FUTURE HAPPINESS 
AND CONTINUED SUCCESS 



172 



FROM THE 

DEPARTMENTS OF: 

ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY 
BIOCHEMISTRY AND 

MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS 
HUMAN GENETICS AND 

DEVELOPMENT 
MICROBIOLOGY 
PATHOLOGY 
PHARMACOLOGY 
PHYSIOLOGY AND 

CELLULAR BIOPHYSICS 



173 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

to the 

CLASS OF 1985 

from 

THE FACULTY AND STAFF 
DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 
CLASS OF 1985 

THE DEPARTMENT 

OF 

REHABILITATION MEDICINE 



174 



Graduate Medical Education 
at Overlook Hospital 

A majorteaching affiliate of the Columbia University 
College of Physicians and Surgeons 



Overlook, known for its progressive leadership 
and sound medical practice, is considered one 
of the nation's foremost community hospitals. 
A voluntary, non-profit health care center, 
Overlook provides extensive modern facilities, 
including 551 beds and 50 bassinets. More than 
2,600 employees and a medical staff of 550 offer 
a broad spectrum of educational and medical- 
surgical services. 

At Overlook, quality patient care has been a 
tradition for more than 75 years. We emphasize 
the training of primary physicians. Approved 
residency programs are offered in: Dentistry; 
Diagnostic Radiology; Emergency Medicine; 
Family Practice; Internal Medicine; Pediatrics; 
and a Transitional First Year. 



Overlook also offers affiliated programs with 
Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and 
St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center, 
New York City, in General Surgery, Urology and 
Obstetrics-Gynecology. Program directors are 
outstanding physicians, all Board-certified 
specialists in their respective fields. 

At Overlook the administrative and medical staff 
constantly evaluate new concepts in the delivery 
of health care, never losing sight of the 
individual, human needs of the patient and the 
family. It is this commitment to excellence in family- 
centered care that has earned Overlook its 
outstanding reputation. 








For information about residency programs 
at Overlook, contact the Department of 
Medical Education, 193 Morris Avenue, Summit, 
New Jersey. 07901 , or call (201) 522-2085. 



Overlook 
Hospital 



175 



Congratulations 

to the 

Class of 1985 

from the 

Department of Surgery 



176 



The Department of Urology 

Wishes to Congratulate the 

Class of 1985 and extend 

Best Wishes for a Successful Future 



Congratulations to 

the Class of 1985 from 

the Staff of 

The New York 

Orthopedic Hospital 

Department of Orthopedic 
Surgery 

Columbia Presbvterian 
Medical Center 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 
CLASS OF '85 

DEPARTMENT OF 
OTOLARYNGOLOGY 



177 



The Department of Pediatrics 

Congratulates the outstanding members of the graduating class and 
all those who chose fields other than Pediatrics, as well. 



BEST WISHES 
FROM THE 

COLUMBIA 

HEALTH SCIENCE 

LIBRARY STAFF 



NELSON'S 

Delicatessen and Restaurant 

A Neighborhood Tradition 

170th Street and Broadway 

Telephone: 923-9606 



178 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 
CLASS OF 1985 

Now that you're starting out in your medical 
career, you'll be spending so much time examining 
the health of others, you may not have time to 
examine the state of your own finances. So while 
you're helping your patients keep physically fit, 
our goal is to keep you fiscally fit. 

As a student, you've had the benefits of Chemical's 
free checking and a ChemBankcard. As a recent 
graduate, you're also invited to take advantage of 
Chemical's free financial counseling as well as 
financial planning seminars specially designed for 
health care professionals. 

It's Chemical's way of not only wishing you 
career success, but of ensuring your financial 
success, too. 

Chemical Bank Chemical Bank 

Richard Donatuti, A.V.P. Daisy Velez, Branch Manager 

1146 St. Nicholas Ave. Main Lobby 

(at 167th Street) Columbia Presbyterian Hospital 

N.Y., N.Y. 10032 168th Street, N.Y., N.Y. 10032 

CkemicalBaink 

THE CHEMISTRY'S JUST RIGHT AT CHEMICAL 

Member FDIC 



179 



ST.LUKESROOSEVELT 



Hospital Center 



St. Lukes — Roosevelt 
Hospital Center 

congratulates 

the Class of 1985, 

for their efforts 

in support of patient care at the 

Hospital Center 

and wishes the Class 

the best in the future. 



180 



Congratulations to the Class of 1985 




&NOBLE 



We at Columbia Medical Center Bookstore extend our congratulations to 
the members of the class of 1985. We hope that our books have helped you 
to build a firm foundation for your careers and we look forward to 
accommodating your future educational needs. 

The Columbia University 

Medical Center Bookstore 

Medical Center 650 W 168 Street New York 100)2 lei (212) 6<)4 4044 

a service of Barnes & Noble 



We carry an extensive selection of the most current medical textbooks 
and microscopes, as well as current cloth, paper and sale books. We also 
offer a money saving text buyback service. 



181 



P&S Yearbook 




The 1985 P&S Yearbook was put together by about fourteen fourth-year 
students over a period of six months. Its completion, despite interviews and 
away-electives, attests to the group effort involved. 

Co-editors Jeff Avner and Peter Bolo were the backbone of the team. Although 
a yearbook neophyte, Jeff dazzled all with his ability to conduct, yearbook 
business while sketching interview travelogs on AAA road maps. Peter, a master 
of layouts and foreign film, was responsible for putting the finishing touches on 
and delivering the book to the printer. 

Among the others, none was more colorful than Lou "Risky Business" 
Brusco, who put the yearbook in the black three weeks ahead of schedule. 
Candid Section editors Robin Brown and Jenny Julien had the unenviable task of 
trying to collect photos while waging a publicity war with Fred Brancati and his 
P&S admissions' tours at Tony's Desk. Lisa Ross, Class Section editor, was on the 
phone with Thornton Studios so often we almost set up a hotline for her. 
Considering the experience of our photographers, T.C. Meng did some truly 
amazing things in his darkroom. Elba Pacheco assisted with layouts for several 
sections and was nearly rewarded with her own centerfold. 

Finally, Scott Shikora was instrumental in completing both the Faculty am 
Business Sections. Joe Alexander reappeared miraculously after a two-month 
abscence to do some eleventh-hour typing. Paul Fritz was kind enough to 
submit some great cartoons. 

We hope the words and photographs collected in this book will help the Class 
of '85 to recall memories of the "P&S Experience. " Please direct any correspond- 
ence to Jeff Avner or Peter Bolo c/o Damage Control, Presbyterian Hospital, W. 
168th Street, New York, New York, 10032. 



January, 1985 



Fred Dirbas 
Editor-in-Chief 




Special Thanks to: 

The Alumni Association for their continuing finan- 
cial and emotional support; the Faculty; those Parents 
who contributed to our fundraising campaign; Janis 
Mitchell, P&S Club Administrative Aide; Mae 
Rudolph and the Public Relations Office; Joe Donovan 
and the Hunter Publishing Company; Ed Thornton, 
our Class Photographer; our Patrons, for advertising in 
the publication; our classmates, for their photographs. 






182 







Jk 




Editor-in-Chief Fred Dirbas 

Editors Jeff Avner, Peter Bolo 

Candid Section Robin Brown, Jenny Julien 

Class Section Lisa Ross, Joe Alexander 

Advertising Section Lou Brusco 

Activities Section Elba Pacheco 

Faculty Section Scott Shikora 

Photography T.C. Meng 

Artwork Paul Fritz 

Assistants Rob Sheiman, Alex Strachan 



Faculty Advisor 




11313: * 

3fM3 3 ; : . 



183 



-— — — 



I'll >"-»" 



— _ 



~ n 





•fc 



^ 






•* 



1 




COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



006426036 





r